In November, 64.55% of Florida voters from all walks of life and political persuasions approved Amendment 4, the Voting Restoration Amendment. This reflects a shared belief that when a debt is paid, its paid.  On January 8, 2019, Amendment 4 goes into effect.


Eligible returning citizens can register to vote starting on January 8, 2019.

With voter approval for Amendment 4, Florida has eliminated a 150-year-old Jim Crow-era law that disenfranchised more people in the state of Florida than the total population of many other states. The amended Constitution restores the voting rights of Floridians with felony convictions, excluding murder or sexual offenses, after they complete all terms of their sentence including parole or probation.

If you or a loved one is planning to register to vote, below is a list of helpful information. If you want to get involved in voter registration efforts, more information is available below.  

  1. Frequently Asked Questions
  2. Helpful information for eligible voters
  3. Ways to register
  4. Requesting Help
  5. Getting involved in voter registration 

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. When does Amendment 4 go into effect?
    The amendment goes into effect on January 8th.
     
  2. If I am a returning citizen who has completed all portions of my sentence, can I register to vote on January 8th?
    Yes.
     
  3. What organization can I contact if I need help getting registered?
    If you have questions about registering to vote, you can contact 877-698-6830
    1. Florida Rights Restoration Coalition: https://floridarrc.com/
    2. League of Women Voters of Florida: https://www.lwvfl.org/ 
       
  4. ​​​Does the legislature need to write rules to implement Amendment 4?
    No. The legislature does not need to write enabling legislation. The amendment is self-executing. The State has conceded this point in its filing in the Hand v. Scott case.  This means that, unlike what we may have seen after Fair Districts or medical marijuana were passed, the legislature does not have to do anything to implement Amendment 4. 
     
  5. What is the legislature’s role in Amendment 4 implementation?
    The legislature is responsible for oversight and funding of the government agencies responsible for administering the implementation of Amendment 4.
     
  6. Do returning citizens register through the normal voter registration process?
    Yes. The existing voter registration form is adequate and sufficient to immediately register individuals impacted by Amendment 4. Question #2 of that form asks individuals to “affirm that I am not a convicted felon, or if I am, my right to vote has been restored.” Individuals can check this box in the same way that they affirm they are U.S. Citizens (see Question #1 on the State’s Voter Registration Application Form). Individuals may also register via the Florida Online Voter Registration System at https://registertovoteflorida.gov/
            
  7. Do returning citizens need to bring proof of a completed sentence before registering?
    No. The responsibility of the citizen is to honestly affirm that, by completing the terms of their sentence, their voting rights have been restored – because, if they have completed their sentence, the voters’ rights have been restored.
     
  8. What does it mean to complete all portions of my sentence?
    We believe that “completion of all terms of sentence” includes any period of incarceration, probation, parole and financial obligations imposed as part of an individual’s sentence. These financial obligations may include restitution, fines, and fees imposed as part of a sentence or a condition of probation under existing Florida statute. That said, fees not specifically identified as part of a sentence or a condition of probation are therefore not necessary for ‘completion of sentence’ and thus, do not need to be paid before an individual may register. These are the policies used by the Office of Offender Review to determine “completion of sentence” and therefore consistent with current state practices.
     
  9. Where can I find more information online about whether I’ve completed the terms of my sentence? 
    For more information, you can contact a number of state organizations including:

FAQs_Amendment4

Download a printable PDF for the Frequently Asked Questions on Amendment 4.


Helpful Information for Eligible Voters

  1. Amendment 4 goes into effect on January 8, 2019. The amended Constitution restores the voting rights of Floridians with felony convictions, exluding murder or sexual offenses, after they complete all terms of their sentence including parole or probation.
     

  2. Starting January 8th, any individual with a felony conviction who has completed all of the terms of their sentence should register to vote by completing a voter registration form. Question #2 of that form asks you to “affirm that I am not a convicted felon, or if I am, my right to vote has been restored.” You should check this box in the same way you affirm that you are U.S. Citizens (see Question #1 on the State’s Voter Registration Application Form).

    You may also register via the Florida Online Voter Registration System: https://registertovoteflorida.gov/
     

  3. You do not need to submit documentation of completion of your sentence when you register to vote, however, you should gather as much documentation as possible to confirm completion of your sentence, or in case you may need to appeal a denial of your voter registration.
     

  4. If you experience problems registering to vote, please contact ACLU of Florida using this link: https://action.aclu.org/legal-intake/fl-amendment4-barrier

HelpfulInformationForEligibleVoters_Amendment4.png

Download a printable PDF for the Helpful Information for Eligible Voters for Amendment 4.


Ways to Register:

  1. In-person: at your local Supervisor of Elections Office
  2. Online: at the Florida Online Voter Registration System
  3. Print and mail the form: The statewide voter registration application form is available for download (English PDF/ Español PDF), or available at any county Supervisor of Elections, local library, or any entity authorized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to issue fishing, hunting, or trapping permits.

Call 1-877-MYVOTE-0 (1-877-698-6830) with any questions.


Requesting Help

If you have questions about registering to vote, you can contact 877-698-6830.

For other problems registering, contact: 

  1. Florida Rights Restoration Coalition: https://floridarrc.com/
  2. ACLU of Florida: https://action.aclu.org/legal-intake/fl-amendment4-barrier

  3. Florida League of Women Voters: https://www.lwvfl.org/

  4. Latino Justice PRLEDF: https://www.latinojustice.org/

For more information you may contact: 

  1. Florida Department of Corrections: http://www.dc.state.fl.us/

  2. Florida Department of Law Enforcement: http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/

  3. Florida Commission on Offender Review: https://www.fcor.state.fl.us/

  4. Florida Clerks of County Courts: https://www.stateofflorida.com/clerks-of-court.aspx

  5. Florida Supervisors of Election: https://dos.myflorida.com/elections/


Getting involved in voter registration

Thank you for your interest in get out the vote efforts in Florida! Organizations across Florida will be working over the next several months to register all eligible Returning Citizens to VOTE. 

If you are interested in getting involved in voter registration efforts, please contact: 

  1. Florida Rights Restoration Coalition: https://floridarrc.com/
  2. Florida League of Women Voters: https://www.lwvfl.org/

  3. Latino Justice PRLEDF: https://www.latinojustice.org/

For third-party voter registration, click here for resources from the League of Women Voters of Florida. 

For other volunteer opportunities with the ACLU of Florida, please sign up by clicking this link: aclufl.org/volunteer

 

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